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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Your Questions Answered By Interventionists

WHO NEEDS TO BE INVOLVED IN AN INTERVENTION?

Family, friends, colleagues, employers or anyone close to the addicted loved one should take part – namely, the spouse or partner, parents, siblings, or close friends.  An interventionist will work with the family to plan and stage the event.

It is important to note that the presence of some individuals, no matter how well-meaning and supportive they may be, may not be a positive choice. Remember, the goal is to help your loved one recognize that addiction is a disorder and that immediate medical and psychological care is needed. Thus, anyone who may detract from that process should not attend. This would include young children and anyone who is living with a personal drug or alcohol addiction, cannot control extreme personal emotions (e.g., anger) and/or anyone with whom the individual does not get along.

WHAT ARE THE STEPS IN AN INTERVENTION

Collaborating with an interventionist. Take the time to ask questions to ensure that you feel comfortable and safe with the interventionist you choose and that they are qualified. 

 

Choose the participants: Collectively determine who should be included in the intervention. At Liberty, we ask you questions about family members and friends who are potential candidates and we work with you to create an effective team for the intervention.

 

Hold a planning meeting: Once you have determined who will take part in the intervention, the interventionist will introduce strategies for all those involved, with the exception of the addicted loved one, ensuring everyone understands the function and structure of the event and is prepared to take a positive role.

 

Enroll the person with addiction in an appropriate treatment program: Prior to the intervention, it is important to enroll your loved one into a treatment program with a start day on the day of the intervention. This will empower the individual to immediately enter treatment right after the intervention.

 

Pack and prepare: To make the transition into treatment a smooth one, family members will need to pack a bag for their loved one that includes everything needed for the duration of treatment. Book all travel reservations needed for your loved one and for the interventionists who will be escorting them to their destination safely.  We will assist you and your loved one every step of the way.

 

Stage the intervention: The intervention itself may take 20 minutes to an hour, or it may take all day – it all depends on whether your loved one is willing or is sober upon arrival and how the conversation unfolds.

 

Follow-through: During the intervention, the loved one will be encouraged to immediately enter treatment. If the client says “yes,” family members will facilitate that process immediately. If the client says “no,” family members will be tasked with following through on changes that ensure no one is enabling continued addiction behaviour.

HOW SHOULD IT BE HANDLED IF AN INTERVENTION DOESN’T GO AS PLANNED?

It is impossible to predict how an intervention will unfold. Addiction is unpredictable; thus, loved ones who are under the influence of a substance or substances may behave erratically as a result. Should the addicted loved one be under the influence of drugs or alcohol upon arrival, we will work with the client at their own pace to get the best possible outcome.

CAN YOU HAVE AN INTERVENTION WITHOUT HIRING A PROFESSIONAL?

Yes. It is possible to have an intervention without hiring an interventionist; however, because of their high success rate, families opt to hire a professional for the following reasons:

 

An interventionist alleviates the pressure during this time of crisis and puts the control in the capable hands of a professional who has been in this situation before.

 

A family mediator can be a resource for personalized answers to questions that come up during the process of staging an intervention.

 

An interventionist offers an air of formality, authority and objectivity to the intervention itself. When a healthcare professional is present, the person living with addiction may be more likely to realize that this is serious and that things will not be allowed to continue in the same way.

 

During the intervention, the interventionist will keep all participants on track, positive and focused on the goal of the event.

 

At Liberty, we will also escort your loved one to the chosen treatment program after the intervention assuring a safe arrival and alleviating that stress for the family. The benefits of sober transportation include a reduced risk of relapse, companion services during potentially risky or stressful circumstances and enhanced safety for your loved one.

DO WE NEED TO WAIT FOR OUR LOVED ONE TO WANT HELP OR HIT BOTTOM BEFORE SEEKING PROFESSIONAL ADDICTION INTERVENTION HELP?

No, you don’t have to wait. In fact, you shouldn’t wait.

 

Families often don’t realize it, but they have the ability to change the situation on their own terms and to set new boundaries to hold the addict or alcoholic accountable. The most difficult task for the interventionist is helping families understand why almost everything they have tried in the past has been unsuccessful.

 

Most families put their efforts and energy into trying to “fix” or “change” the addict or alcoholic, rather than changing the situation. Families actually have the power and control to do the latter, but not the former. Through the loving, caring approach of our interventionists at Liberty, the family can take back control and help give their loved one options to a better life in the process.

DOES THE PERSON HAVE TO BE SOBER/STRAIGHT IN ORDER TO DO THE INTERVENTION?

Obviously, sobriety will help establish the clarity of mind required to assess any problematic situation, yet this may not always be a realistic expectation of the intervention client. Regardless, we will work with the client at their own pace to get the best possible outcome

WHAT IF THEY WON’T LISTEN?

This may likely be a reality; however, an intervention can still succeed as the interventionists are educated and trained to confront manipulation/control issues at the heart of any situation. The coaching from the pre-intervention meetings equips family responses to be consistent and focused around the loved one's need to seek recovery. This will naturally empower the client to consider change and treatment.